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Giovanni Circella for the Washington Post "The widespread adoption of remote work has enabled greater flexibility to travel — but not for everyone"

March 01, 2021

Giovanni Circella, director of 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program at the University of California at Davis, has been studying how the pandemic has affected mobility and says the widespread adoption of remote work has enabled greater flexibility to travel — but not for everyone. “It’s true mostly for higher-income individuals and white-collar workers,” he says, noting that the option of remote work is far less prevalent among lower-income and minority employees, who are also more likely to be essential workers.

Student of the Month: Jai Malik

March 01, 2021
Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Delhi. I moved to UC Davis in 2017 to pursue graduate studies in Transportation. 

What are you working on?

My research has been focused on changing mobility in the U.S. and other countries due to emerging transportation technologies: shared mobility and self-driving cars. In the last year my focus has also been on the change in the transportation sector due to the COVID-19 pandemic. My study areas include the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, India, China, Germany and the South East Asian region. 

Giovanni Circella is interviewed by Alexa St. John from Automotive news on Pandemic transportation changes in cities that may last

October 07, 2020

It's important to implement these changes correctly, said Giovanni Circella, director of the 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program at the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis. "There is a general goal that means we cannot really let our cities just suffocate in an ocean of cars, which could be a very likely outcome if we let cities self-adjust, and if people just drive their car because they're scared of getting on public transit or because there are fewer options," he said.