Emissions from AV Deployment in California Under Various Ownership Models

self driving pic

PI

Giovanni Circella

Description

This project evaluates potential future scenarios of deployment of light-duty connected and automated vehicles (CAV) on vehicle miles traveled (VMT), energy usage, and greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria pollutant emissions in California through the application of the California Statewide Travel Demand Model (CSTDM) coupled with an in-depth analysis of the potential transformations introduced by CAVs in various aspects of transportation supply and demand policy and economic characteristics acquired from previous studies and a workshop with experts. In the study, we consider various assumptions associated with various penetration levels of light-duty connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) and fleet mix at the transportation system-level in California through 2050 using a travel demand forecasting modeling approach coupled with an in-depth analysis of the potential transformations introduced by CAVs in transportation supply and demand policy and economic characteristics acquired from previous studies and a workshop with experts. The project leverages insights from on-going research developed by the team and colleagues at other institutions, the application of regional models to predict the impact of CAVs, the analysis of behavioral data collected in other studies, and benefits from the contribution of a pool of expert advisors and a workshop with modelers, planners and policymakers that will help define the CAV deployment scenarios, the assumptions to introduce in the modeling framework to test the scenarios, and the likelihood of the future scenarios. The analysis will pay particular attention to evaluating how CAVs can be employed in conjunction with shared modes of transportation, including public transit and shared-mobility services.